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Applying For a Mortgage? Here’s What You Should AVOID Once You Do

Key Takeaways:

While it’s exciting to start thinking about moving in and decorating after you’ve applied for your mortgage, there are some key things to keep in mind before you close. Here’s a list of things you may not realize you need to avoid after applying for your home loan.

Plymouth Homes Plymouth Real Estate First-Time Home Buyers Market Update Mortgage Loans Real Estate Update Shifting Market Kime Realty Realtors

Don’t

Don’t deposit large sums of cash. Lenders need to source your money, and cash isn’t easily traceable. Before you deposit any amount of cash into your accounts, discuss the proper way to document your transactions with your loan officer.

Don’t make any large purchases. It’s not just home-related purchases that could disqualify you from your loan. Any large purchases can be red flags for lenders. People with new debt have higher debt-to-income ratios (how much debt you have compared to your monthly income). Since higher ratios make for riskier loans, borrowers may no longer qualify for their mortgage. Resist the temptation to make any large purchases, even for furniture or appliances.

Don’t co-sign loans for anyone. When you cosign for a loan, you’re making yourself accountable for that loan’s success and repayment. With that obligation comes higher debt-to-income ratios as well. Even if you promise you won’t be the one making the payments, your lender will have to count the payments against you.

Don’t switch bank accounts. Lenders need to source and track your assets. That task is much easier when there’s consistency among your accounts. Before you transfer any money, speak with your loan officer.

Don’t apply for new credit. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a new credit card or a new car, when you have your credit report run by organizations in multiple financial channels (mortgage, credit card, auto, etc.), it will have an impact on your FICO® score. Lower credit scores can determine your interest rate and possibly even your eligibility for approval.

Don’t close any accounts. Many buyers believe having less available credit makes them less risky and more likely to be approved. This isn’t true. A major component of your score is your length and depth of credit history (as opposed to just your payment history) and your total usage of credit as a percentage of available credit. Closing accounts has a negative impact on both of those aspects of your score.

Discuss changes with your lender. Be upfront about any changes that occur or you’re expecting to occur when talking with your lender. Blips in income, assets, or credit should be reviewed and executed in a way that ensures your home loan can still be approved. If your job or employment status has changed recently, share that with your lender as well. Ultimately, it’s best to fully disclose and discuss your intentions with your loan officer before you do anything financial in nature.

Bottom Line

You want your home purchase to go as smoothly as possible. Remember, before you make any large purchases, move your money around, or make major life changes, be sure to consult your lender – someone who’s qualified to explain how your financial decisions may impact your home loan.

The current housing market is not a repeat of the previous financial crisis in 2008. The two primary factors that contributed to the housing market crash back then were cheap credit and lax lending standards. Remember the terms subprime, mortgage-backed securities, CDOs, and adjustable rate mortgage? Thankfully, that’s not what’s making headlines this time around.

Today, lending standards are more strict than they were 15 years ago, and because of this, most homeowners are not teetering on loan default like they were back in 2008. In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, banks introduced various programs to help homeowners stay current on their mortgages and avoid default. The result is historic mortgage balance lows, with loans that are 90 days past due pegged at just 0.5%. That’s a far cry from the staggering 11.36% rate back in 2010 when homeowners struggled to make payments.

Historical Context

Putting today’s housing market in proper historical context is paramount to making an informed decision. While the current 7% mortgage interest rates are certainly higher than the pandemic-induced low of 2.65% in December 2020 (the lowest in history!), that doesn’t mean you should avoid buying a home. Compared to the all-time high of 18.45% set back in 1981, today’s average rate of 7% is suddenly far less imposing.

Experts all agree: home equities are going to decline. The only dispute between analysts is by how much, with some analysts projecting an average decline of about 20%. According to Black Knight, a mortgage technology and data provider, home prices have declined slightly, but mortgage holders possess $11.5 trillion in tappable equity.

Even though recent news and numbers seem to suggest that the real estate market may be experiencing a slowdown, Black Knight added that the “market is on strong footing to weather a correction” given that the total market leverage (including both first and second liens) was just 42% of mortgaged homes’ values – the lowest number on record.

Case-Shiller Index

Eager would-be homebuyers waiting for home prices to fall have some good news ahead of them. But, homeowners have good news, too. While there’s plenty of panic around a “decline” in home prices, the Case-Shiller Index reports it’s just 2.2%—meaning homeowners are still in command of a 38.33% increase in the last two years.

With mortgage interest rates hovering around 7% and home values stabilizing, the tail-end of 2022 or 2023 may be the best time for you to finally make that move, especially as two-thirds of major regional housing markets (98 out of 148) prices continue to drop.

We’ll Help You Buy for the Right Price

When you’re ready to make your move, reach out and contact us. We know the local housing market and can help guide you to the best deals available on the market today. And, there are plenty of ways to extend your buying power and reduce your interest rates! We can’t wait to share our proven strategies with you, so contact us today at Kime Realty, Realtors at 734-446-5744 or Info@KimeRealty.com

Plymouth Homes Plymouth Real Estate First-Time Home Buyers Market Update Mortgage Loans Real Estate Update Shifting Market Kime Realty Realtors   

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